SEC Has Recovered Over $1 Billion Due to Whistleblower Tips

Over the past week, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission has issued total rewards of over $20 million to three SEC whistleblowers. As a result, SEC enforcement actions involving whistleblowers have now recovered more than $1 billion in financial remedies against whistleblowers.

The SEC whistleblower program has been accepting tips for more than five years now and has been repeatedly acknowledged as an important tool in the government’s arsenal to detect and stop violations of federal securities laws.

In the first announcement (last week), the SEC split more than $16 million between two whistleblowers. According to the press release, the first whistleblower alerted the agency to the misconduct that became the focus of the investigation and the cornerstone of the enforcement action. The second SEC whistleblower on this matter provided significant additional information and provided ongoing cooperation that saved significant time and agency resources.

One interesting aspect of this announcement was that the second whistleblower received a similar award to the first. Although the SEC whistleblower program favors the first person to provide information to the U.S. Government, it makes clear that there is still substantial value to the Government in receiving information after the investigation has already started.

In the second announcement (two days ago), the SEC paid a former company insider more than $4.1 million for reporting a widespread, multi-year violation of the securities laws. According to the press release, the whistleblower was a foreign national working outside of the United States. The individual alerted the SEC to the fraud and provided assistance throughout the investigation.

No money has been taken or withheld from harmed investors to pay whistleblower awards. When Congress set up the whistleblower programs in the Dodd-Frank Act, it committed a certain amount of money in the budget to the payment of whistleblower awards. As a result, rewards are not paid out of the amount of funds recovered even though the amount of funds paid are expressed as a percentage of the money collected from the enforcement action.

More awards are expected. In the financial reports released about the program last month, the SEC recognized contingent liabilities of $221 million. This suggests that there are at least $200 million more in awards announcements coming.