Amazon Working Conditions Just As Bad for Delivery Drivers

0

Recent news headlines have focused on the “unsafe” and “grueling” working conditions that employees labor under in Amazon warehouses across the globe. While the media focuses its attention on the warehouses, delivery drivers working for Amazon are now stepping forward to have their stories told as well. 

Amazon is famed for its lightning fast delivery times, with customers often receiving orders within the same day. These tight delivery schedules make for stressful and often hazardous working conditions that endanger drivers. 

 

Amazon Drivers Are Overworked and Underpaid

Amazon delivery drivers are reporting working ten to fourteen hours in a shift. This is in part because drivers are not allowed to return any packages from their routes, meaning drivers can make over 160 stops per shift. 

While the pay rate seems decent enough, with drivers starting at $15 an hour, this rate is actually far less than the average starting wage for other delivery drivers. For example, UPS drivers are represented by the Teamsters Union that starts their wages at $21 an hour, up to $40 an hour or more for more experienced drivers. 

 

The Amazon Mentor App Leads to Invasive Oversight for Drivers

When drivers start their shift, they first log into the Amazon “Mentor” app. The Mentor app provides information on where to leave packages, access codes to apartment buildings, and dictates every step of the drivers day. The app tracks and measures driving behaviors such as speeding, harsh braking, or making phone calls, and gives the drivers a score based on these behaviors. 

Since the Mentor app is constantly monitoring the drivers every move, it also alerts their supervisors if they deviate or stop along the route even briefly. When a van stops for longer than three minutes, a dispatcher will call the driver and ask why. This constant oversight creates a stressful environment for drivers when dropping off packages or simply trying to take a lunch or restroom break.

 

No Bathroom Breaks for Delivery Drivers

With the Mentor app constantly monitoring drivers, every stop has to be accounted for. That leaves most drivers with no time to use the restroom on their ten hour shifts. Drivers need to use public restrooms such as ones inside grocery stores, so if their route does not include an area that has such a location, drivers have to make a long detour that could cost them their job. Because of these strict measures, drivers report using empty water bottles in their vehicles instead of stopping to use the restroom.

 

Amazon Hires Contractors To Prevent Workers From Organizing

Amazon has consistently stated that they are not responsible for these working conditions because the drivers are not actually Amazon employees. That’s because Amazon uses contractors for delivery services, a move that allows them to duck responsibility, while also helping to prevent workers from organizing for better conditions. 

The Teamsters Union has been working with Amazon drivers and the delivery service providers that hire them in an attempt to curtail these exploitative practices, with the director of the Teamsters Amazon project stating, “This sort of model is problematic for the entire (delivery) industry”. 

 

Do Amazon Delivery Drivers Get Overtime?

Although drivers are being asked to work long hours with few breaks, they are still only paid flat day rates for their work with no additional pay for overtime hours. This has led to multiple class-action lawsuits being filed against the company in over ten states. 

Amazon recently agreed to pay out over $8.2 million in a class-action lawsuit alleging that they were engaging in wage-theft by refusing to properly compensate drivers. The lawsuit claims that Amazon failed to pay the minimum wage, and denied compensation for rest breaks or overtime. Amazon has also been fined $6.4 million by California regulators for similar wage-theft violations, though Amazon has stated it is appealing the fine. 

 

Workers Deserve Protections

While Amazon founder Jeff Bezos disputes Elon Musk for the title of world’s richest person, the drivers who keep his company running are struggling to pay rent, while working under increasingly stressful and unsafe conditions. 

The team at McEldrew Young Purtell Merritt have decades of experience fighting for workers, and are following these developments closely. If you work as a delivery driver for Amazon and have been subject to unfair working conditions, contact us today at 1-866-333-7715 or online via our form.  

 

 

Update on Overtime and Minimum Wage in PA

0
wages attorneys Philadelphia

At the end of August only a few days before Labor Day, a federal judge struck down the new rule issued by the Labor Department during the Obama administration to make more than 4 million workers eligible for time and a half overtime by setting a higher salary threshold for the overtime exemption. The Obama administration rule released in May 2016 would have doubled the threshold to exempt executive, administrative and professional employees from overtime to $47,476 from $23,660.

Minimum Wage to Rise in 19 States for 2017

0
minimum wage philadelphia

New York, California and 17 other states are increasing the minimum wage for employees for the new year, which will increase wages for millions of the lowest paid workers. If President Obama had succeeded in adjusting the FLSA overtime pay requirement for inflation, 2016 would have been a remarkable year for the working class.

Philadelphia’s New Wage Theft Law

0
Mceldrew Young Philadelphia personal injury lawyers

A bill passed back in December to fight wage theft in Philadelphia will go in effect today, July 1, 2016. It’s one more reason for employees to cheer Mayor Nutter’s tenure in charge of the city.

New Overtime Pay Rules to Start in December

0
Mceldrew Young Philadelphia personal injury lawyers

The Department of Labor has finalized regulations to require overtime pay to approximately 4.2 million salaried workers. In order for a business to claim that an employee is eligible for the overtime exemption as an executive, administrative or professional worker under the Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”) past November, the individual will need to make a salary of over $47,476 a year.

Uber Settles 2 Driver Misclassification Lawsuits for $100 Million

0
Mceldrew Young Philadelphia personal injury lawyers

Uber, the San Francisco startup that offers a popular international ride-hailing app, will continue to use independent contractors as drivers after settling class-action lawsuits arguing that the drivers were actually employees rather than independent contractors. The lawsuits for drivers in California and Massachusetts were highly publicized disputes in the ongoing battle between employers and workers over their labor rights in the new economy.

California to Up Minimum Wage to $15 an Hour

0
Mceldrew Young Philadelphia personal injury lawyers

A deal Saturday between lawmakers and labor unions in California will soon put the state at the forefront of the national debate over a living wage. Several large cities including Seattle and Los Angeles have already agreed to phase in a minimum wage hike to $15 an hour but California would be the first state to require it.

Wage Theft Bill in Congress Adds Teeth to FLSA

0

Three Democratic lawmakers introduced a proposal into the U.S. Congress today to give teeth to the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) in the fight against wage theft.

Wage Proposals Could Benefit Philly Workers

0
construction injury lawyers philadelphia

There are a few different wage proposals at various levels of the government which we thought we would call attention to at the conclusion of a work week of beautiful weather here in Philadelphia. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and the Federal Governments are considering wage proposals to increase the minimum wage, stop wage theft and help unemployed workers get back to a job.

Wage Theft in Oil, Agriculture, Interns and Freelance Jobs Highlighted

0
Mceldrew Young Philadelphia personal injury lawyers

There’s been a lot of news about wage theft in the media recently. An article published in Inside Energy discussed the surge in claims by workers involved in the oil industry as the price of oil has dropped. According to their report, the number of lawsuits in Colorado for wage violations in 2015 was nine times the number in 2010. The number in Texas, known for oil and gas, increased nearly ten times.

Call Now ButtonCall Now