DOJ Aggressively Pursues Health Care Fraud in 2019

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In the first half of 2019, the United States Department of Justice (“DOJ”) has shown that it intends to aggressively pursue health care providers who engage in fraudulent schemes to enrich themselves at the expense of their patients and American taxpayers. The DOJ has been especially diligent in its investigation and prosecution of health care providers who receive kickbacks and other improper incentives, as well as those on the other side of the transaction who make the illegal payments.

Recent DOJ Settlements Involving Health Care Providers

A review of the 2019 DOJ press release headlines offers insight into the scope and pervasiveness of illegal practices that some health care providers allegedly engage in:

  • Avanti Hospitals LLC, and Its Owners Agree to Pay $8.1 Million to Settle Allegations of Making Illegal Payments in Exchange for Referrals – January 28, 2019
  • Pathology Laboratory Agrees to Pay $63.5 Million for Providing Illegal Inducements to Referring Physicians – January 30, 2019
  • Covidien to Pay Over $17 Million to The United States for Allegedly Providing Illegal Remuneration in the Form of Practice and Market Development Support to Physicians – March 11, 2019
  • MedStar Health to Pay U.S. $35 Million to Resolve Allegations that it Paid Kickbacks to a Cardiology Group in Exchange for Referrals – March 21, 2019
  • United States Files Lawsuit Against West Virginia Hospital, Its Management Company, and Its CEO Based on Kickbacks and Other Improper Payments to Physicians – March 25, 2019
  • Former CEO of Hospital Chain to Pay $3.46 Million to Resolve False Billing and Kickback Allegations – April 30, 2019
  • Pharmaceutical Company Agrees to Pay $17.5 Million to Resolve Allegations of Kickbacks to Medicare Patients and Physicians – April 30, 2019
  • Rialto Capital Management and Current Owner of Indiana Hospital to Pay $3.6 Million to Resolve False Claims Act Allegations Arising from Kickbacks to Referring Physicians – June 3, 2019

The DOJ’s Arsenal in the Fight Against Health Care Fraud

Three statutes are most often implicated in fraud and abuses cases involving health care providers are the False Claims Act, 31 U.S.C. §§ 3729-3733 (“FCA”); the Anti-Kickback Statute 42 U.S.C. § 1320a-7b(b) (“AKS”); and the Physician Self-Referral Law, 42 U.S.C. § 1395nn (commonly known as the “Stark Law”).

The False Claims Act

The federal False Claims Act, 31 U.S.C. §§ 3729-3733, authorizes a private individual, known as a “relator,” to bring a cause of action on behalf of the federal government to recover funds lost because of fraud or other misconduct. A lawsuit filed under the False Claims Act is known as a qui tam action, and it allows a relator to sue on behalf of the government and, if successful, receive a percentage of the recovery.

The FCA was signed into law by President Lincoln during the Civil War. It was originally intended as means to legally pursue unscrupulous contractors who defrauded the Union Army by selling inferior goods, such as sawdust mixed with gunpowder, crippled horses, and boots made of cardboard. Even today, the FCA remains one of the most effective and important tools to prevent the government from purchasing overpriced, inferior, or nonexistent goods or services.

Most FCA violations in the health care industry arise from the submission of false or fraudulent claims for payment to government-funded health care programs, such as Medicare, Medicaid, CHAMPVA, and TRICARE. The civil penalties for violations of the FCA can be substantial. The filing of false claims can result in fines of up to three times the amount of the government’s losses, plus a penalty ranging from $11,463 to $22,927 for each false claim submitted. If a health care provider submits a claim to the government that resulted from a kickback or Stark law violation, it can also render the claim false or fraudulent.  This, in turn, creates liability under the FCA, in addition to liability under the AKS or Stark law. Some examples of FCA violations involving health care providers can be found here.

The FCA’s whistleblower provision allows a relator to file a lawsuit on behalf of the United States. If the government makes a successful recovery based on original information provided by a whistleblower, the whistleblower may be entitled to a reward of 15 to 30% of the government’s recovery.

The Anti-Kickback Statute

The Anti-Kickback Statute, 42 U.S.C. § 1320a-7b(b), prohibits offering, paying, soliciting, or receiving “remuneration” to induce referrals of items or services covered by Medicare, Medicaid, and other federally-funded health care programs. The AKS is a criminal law that involves any item or service payable by a federal health care program (e.g., drugs, supplies, or health care services for Medicare or Medicaid patients). “Remuneration” includes anything of value and can include items other than cash, such as free rent, expensive hotel stays and meals, and excessive compensation for medical directorships or consulting services.

In certain sectors of the economy, a reward given to someone for a business referral is a commonly accepted and legal practice. However, compensation paid to someone for a referral involving a federal health care program is a crime. The AKS applies to both those who offer or pay remuneration as well as those who solicit or receive remuneration. Since an AKS violation can result in criminal liability, the intent of each party to the transaction is a critical element to determining culpability.

United States v. Greber, 760 F.2d 68 (3rd Cir. 1985) is a landmark case which held that paying a referring physician to use a laboratory’s services, even if the remuneration was compensation for professional services, was a violation of the AKS. Greber was a physician who was board certified in cardiology. Greber’s company, Cardio-Med, Inc., provided diagnostic services, some of which were billed to Medicare. The government eventually charged Greber with, inter alia, Medicare fraud in violation of 42 U.S.C. § 1395nn(b)(2)(B). The charges were based on Cardio-Med’s practice of paying kickbacks from Medicare funds to referring physicians in order to obtain future referrals. Greber claimed that the payments were for work performed by physicians, and future referrals were only one purpose of the payments. Greber was convicted, and he appealed. The Third Circuit affirmed the conviction, holding that a payment to a referring physician is illegal if it is done to encourage future referrals, even if the payment is compensatory. 760 F.2d at 72.

The policy reasons underlying the AKS are based on the premise that kickbacks exploit the health care system, drive up costs for medical services, and impede fair competition in the industry. Kickbacks can also result in patient steering, which can compromise the decision-making process of health care providers and institutions. Hospitals that participate in the Medicare program, or other federally-sponsored health care programs, are required to enter into contracts in which they agree to comply with federal laws and regulations, including the AKS.

Although the AKS is a criminal statute, it provides both criminal and civil penalties for violations. The criminal penalties can include fines of up to $25,000 and five years’ imprisonment for each violation. The Office of the Inspector General for the Department of Health and Human Services can pursue civil penalties of up to $50,000 per violation plus three times the amount of sustained by the government.

The Physician Self-Referral Law

The Physician Self-Referral Law or Stark Law, 42 U.S.C. § 1395nn, prohibits a physician from referring patients for certain “designated health services” payable by Medicare to an entity with which the physician, or his or her immediate family member, has a financial relationship, unless one of a number of specific exceptions applies. A financial relationship can include ownership or investment interests, or compensation arrangements between a physician, or immediate family, and an entity that furnishes designated health services.

Designated health services include:

  • Clinical laboratory services;
  • Physical therapy, occupational therapy, and outpatient speech-language pathology services;
  • Radiology and certain other imaging services;
  • Radiation therapy services and supplies;
  • DME and supplies;
  • Parenteral and enteral nutrients, equipment, and supplies;
  • Prosthetics, orthotics, and prosthetic devices and supplies;
  • Home health services;
  • Outpatient prescription drugs; and
  • Inpatient and outpatient hospital services.

The Stark law is a strict liability statute, which means that a physician does not have to possess the specific intent to violate the law. Much like the AKS, the Stark Law is intended to ensure that a physician’s medical judgment is based only on the best interests of the patient and is not swayed by improper financial incentives.

Penalties for Stark law violations can include:

  • Denial of payment – Medicare will not pay for designated health services that were provided pursuant to a prohibited referral.
  • Refund of payment – Any entity that collects payment for designated health services that were provided pursuant to a prohibited referral must refund all such payments.
  • Imposition of civil monetary penalties – a civil monetary penalty of up to $15,000 can be imposed for each prohibited service, as well as additional civil assessments and potential liability under the False Claims Act.
  • Exclusion from federal health care programs — Physicians and entities can be excluded from participation in government-sponsored health care programs.

The Necessity of Whistleblowers

The government lacks the resources to identify and prosecute every instance of fraud carried out by unscrupulous physicians, medical equipment providers or hospitals. Many settlements and successful verdicts reported by the DOJ are often based on information provided by a whistleblower willing to come forward after hearing or witnessing some type of improper conduct. In the health care sector, a whistleblower is often a current or ex-business partner, a hospital or office staff member, a patient, or a business competitor.

Anyone who is an “original source” of information involving fraud against the government can be a whistleblower. As defined in the False Claims Act, original source means “an individual who either (i) prior to a public disclosure . . . has voluntarily disclosed to the Government the information on which allegations or transactions in a claim are based, or (2) who has knowledge that is independent of and materially adds to the publicly disclosed allegations or transactions, and who has voluntarily provided the information to the Government before filing an action under this section.” 31 U.S.C. § 3730(e)(4)(B).

There are many pitfalls to filing a whistleblower claim with a government department or agency. Without proper legal representation, a whistleblower might not receive a reward even though he or she provided information and assisted the government in the investigation that resulted in a successful recovery. The attorneys at McEldrew Young have a proven track record of success in all types of whistleblower cases. If you have evidence of a fraudulent scheme involving a health care provider or facility, or any other type of fraud against the government, the attorneys at McEldrew Young will provide a free confidential review of your evidence and recommend the best course of action. For a no obligation consultation, call Eric L. Young or Paul Shehadi at (215) 367-5151 or you can submit your information through the contact form found on most pages of this site.

Southern District of New York Federal Court Greenlights McEldrew Young’s False Claim Act Case Against Teva Pharmaceuticals for Trial Involving Allegations of Nationwide Kickback Scheme

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TEva

Chief U.S. District Judge Colleen McMahon ruled on February 27th that a False Claims Act suit brought by two former employees of Teva Pharmaceuticals USA, Inc. will proceed to a trial on the merits.  In a detailed seventy-page opinion, the Court rejected numerous arguments asserted by Teva Pharmaceuticals USA, Inc. and two of its subsidiaries (“Teva”) in its motion for summary judgment.  The ruling preserves all of the relators’ claims asserted against Teva under the federal False Claims Act.

False Claims Act Yields $519 Million for Whistleblowers in FY2016

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street

The Justice Department announced the third highest annual recovery in the history of the False Claims Act yesterday – $4.7 billion for the federal government for fiscal year 2016 (ending Sept. 30th). Whistleblowers received awards of $519 million for their assistance recovering $2.9 billion – more than half of the funds returned through settlements and judgments. During President Obama’s Administration, the Government paid more than $4 billion to whistleblowers for their information and assistance in the recovery of nearly $24 billion through qui tam lawsuits.

Pharma Patients at Risk with New Drugs, Corruption

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Two reports on the pharmaceutical industry issued recently put the safety of drugs into question, with one questioning whether new drugs are put on the American market too soon (before all the risks are known) and the other noting the global risks of corruption within the drug industry on public health.

Free Call Center Services Cost PA Company $34.8 Million in Kickback Case

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Mceldrew Young Philadelphia personal injury lawyers

Health care kickbacks continue to be a hot area of whistleblower practice under the False Claims Act in 2016, with two more settlement announcements already this week.

Pharma Payments Increase Doctor Brand Prescriptions

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For years, many pharmaceutical and medical device companies have paid doctors for speaking engagements as well as offered free meals, gifts and entertainment. A new study by ProPublica analyzing drugmaker spending and Medicare prescription data to conclude that these payments and gifts translate into higher patient prescriptions for brand-name drugs. The analysis concludes that physicians who accepted payments from drug and device companies were two to three times as likely to prescribe high rates of brand-name drugs.

Medtronic Shelling out the Big Bucks

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Medical device manufacturer Medtronic has voluntarily disclosed that it paid almost $16 million in royalties and consulting fees in the first quarter of 2010.  Of this amount, the vast majority–$14.2 million–went to orthopaedic specialists or surgeons, with $13.9 million of that in the form of royalties for surgical inventions. More than 200 doctors were the beneficiaries of Medtronic’s largess, including 13 in Medtronic’s squeaky-clean home state of Minnesota. One orthopaedic surgeon in Tenessee received almost $4 million in royalties!

Investigators with Senate Finance Committee under  Senator Chuck Grassley have been investigating Medtronic’s relationship with several orthopaedic surgeons for years. In 2006, Medtronic agreed to pay the government $40 million to settle allegations that the company paid kickbacks to surgeons to get them to buy Medtronic products. The DOJ described Medtronic’s relationships with doctors as “sham consulting agreements, sham royalty agreements and lavish trips to desirable locations” which the company offered to doctors between 1998 to 2003.

Medtronic makes big money off of the products it allegedly pays doctors to endorse. For example, Medtronic made $815 million in 2007 alone off of Infuse, a spinal product, which was the subject of a whistleblower lawsuit. With such enormous profits at stake, it is not surprising that device manufacturers like Medtronic pay fees to doctors and sponsor junkets.

Once again, all of this goes back to the ever-increasing role drug and medical device companies play in our lives. Health care is such a big business (emphasis on business) that the major players like Medtronic will keep shelling out what seems like big bucks for serious ROI. As more Americans become insured under the new health care bill and a whole new market opens for drugs and devices, the pecuniary carrot will be all the more enticing to these companies.

This article is brought to you by the QTT, the epicenter for whistleblowers and people interested in the False Claims Act, Qui Tam Provisions, and Medicare and Medicaid fraud. To discuss a potential case, please call Eric Young at 1 (800) 590-4116.

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